Secretary Williams to present award to Ouray High School

Evan Vann, a junior at Ouray High School, helped his school receive an award for voter registration.

When Evan Vann approached his fellow students at Ouray High School and asked if they wanted to preregister to vote, he got some lukewarm receptions.

“A few them said they really had no interest,” Vann recalled. “One of them told me, ‘I really don’t plan on voting — ever.'”

But Evan persisted, which is why Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams on Saturday will present the Eliza Pickrell Routt award to Ouray High School for its outstanding voter registration efforts. The award is given to schools where more than 85 percent of eligible seniors are registered to vote.

The presentation will be made at Ouray’s senior high school banquet. Vann, a junior, will be present.

Colorado is one of 11 states that allows residents as young as 16 to preregister to vote. The group Inspire Colorado has been working around the state to make it happen.

“Achieving the award at a smaller school is an impressive feat,” said Inspire Colorado’s Ryan Drysdale. “At Ouray, Evan and his teachers had to register nearly a dozen seniors in order to reach 85 percent.”

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Five Colorado governors offer up some advice

Secretary of State Wayne Williams with former Gov. Roy Romer, his wife Bea and their son Tom.

What a treat to visit with all five of Colorado’s living governors, who participated Thursday morning in a policy discussion on partisan politics.

They talked about their individual legacies and also offered advice to President Trump, according to The Denver Post’s Jesse Paul.

The governors: Dick Lamm, who was first elected in 1974, Roy Romer, Bill Owens, Bill Ritter and the current occupant, John Hickenlooper, who is term limited after next year.

As a reporter, I covered Owens, Ritter and Hickenlooper. I never covered Lamm or Romer but I interviewed them countless times over the years.

And while at the Rocky Mountain News, I was assigned to write Lamm’s and Romer’s obituaries and have them ready to go, you know, just in case. Yes, awkward, but Lamm was very gracious when I explained why I was interviewing him. My lede: “Dick Lamm did his duty today.”

Lamm and Romer outlived the Rocky, which died in 2009.

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2017 Go Code challenge winners focus on water, noise and farmers

Secretary of State Wayne Williams with Andrew Cole, the program manager for Go Code Colorado, which held its final competition Wednesday night. (SOS photo)

Wednesday marked the end of another successful year for Go Code Colorado, a statewide business app challenge housed in Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams’ office.

After months of preparing, the top 10 teams gave their final pitches to a panel of judges. A member from each team spent 10 minutes explaining their app idea, followed by a 10-minute question-and-answer period.

“I don’t know if this is uniquely Colorado, but it’s the best of Colorado,” Andrew Cole, program manager for Go Code, said after Secretary Williams announced the three winning teams.

The Seawell ballroom at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts filled with cheers from the winning team members and their friends and families, and some groans from those who made it as far as the finale but did not win. Some vowed to return next year.

The three teams — Drip, Hud Buddy and Magpie Supply — will each receive $25,000 contract from the state and a sponsor incentive package.

“I continue to be impressed by the creativity and collaboration of the Go Code Colorado teams,” Secretary Williams said. “Teams continue to show the value of public data if we can get it into the hands of innovative and entrepreneurial people who have a different perspective on how to use it.”

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Gov. Hickenlooper signs campaign-finance reform measure into law

Gov. John Hickenlooper signs into law House Bill 1155 concerning campaign finance. Present are, left to right, Rep. Dan Thurlow, R-Grand Junction, Secretary of State Wayne Williams, SOS  legislative liaison Tim Griesmer, Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert, and elections legal manager Ben Schler. (SOS photo)

Military voters will be protected and voter intent honored, candidates will be given a chance to correct errors on campaign-finance reports and avoid what could be absurd fines, and nonprofits will have enhanced ability to raise money under three bills Gov. John Hickenlooper signed into law Tuesday.

“We want to establish common-sense processes to ensure that Coloradans can meet the requirements of the law,” said Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams. “Working with legislators from both parties, we improved business, charity, and election procedures during this legislative session.”

Williams said he is pleased that nine of the 11 measures his office advocated for passed the Democratic-controlled House and the Republican-led Senate during the 2017 session, which ended earlier this month. So far, seven of the bills have been signed into law — three on Tuesday — and two are awaiting action by the governor’s office.

Among the bills receiving action Tuesday: House Bill 1155, which allows candidates to cure campaign finance reports.

“I love this bill,” said the House sponsor, Rep. Dan Thurlow, R-Grand Junction. “It fixes a problem that led to ‘gotchas.'”

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Peak to Peak High School receives award for voter registration effort

Robin Peterson, a junior at Peak to Peak High School, is flanked by Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert, left, and Ryan Drysdale, Inspire Colorado’s program coordinator.

Another Colorado high school received top honors for voter registration.

Peak to Peak charter school students in Lafayette were the recipients of the Eliza Pickrell Routt award presented by the Colorado Secretary of State’s office.

Robin Peterson, a junior at Peak to Peak, worked with Ryan Drysdale, the program coordinator for Inspire Colorado, and the school’s English teachers to register 85 percent of the senior class and a majority of the junior class. Principal Kyle Mathews praised Robin’s efforts in getting her peers registered to vote.

“She really had her boots on the ground with this,” he said. “She is very civically engaged and brought that political passion to our campus.”

Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert made the trip to Boulder County in the middle of Colorado’s spring snowstorm to present the award to P2P’s juniors and seniors.

“Congratulations to you. This is what democracy is about, being engaged and making a difference in your community,” she said.

The award is named after Eliza Pickrell Routt, wife of Colorado’s first governor, John Long Routt, after whom Routt County is named. She was the first woman to register to vote in Colorado.

Kit Carson and Eads high schools also received the same honor this month. Ouray High School students will be awarded it on Saturday. Last year, Yuma and Eaglecrest high schools were the first recipients of this award.