Be like (Wayne) and Moffat County

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams holds up a sign that the Moffat County clerk and recorder's office made for him. (SOS photo)
Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams holds up a sign that the Moffat County clerk and recorder’s office made for him. (SOS photo)

Moffat County is going one step further for the Nov. 8 election, urging its residents to be smart, vote early and “Be Like (Fill in the Blank).”

County Clerk Lila Herod (“Be Like Lila”) credited her deputy chief of elections, Amanda Tomlinson, for the new sign campaign that asks voters in Colorado’s farthest-northwest county to vote early.

Moffat County made a sign for Secretary of State Wayne Williams, which Tomlinson and another staffer, Tori Pingley — “my girls,” Herod calls them — hand delivered when they visited Denver Tuesday.

“This is (Wayne). (Wayne) does not like to wait in line,” it reads. “(Wayne) votes early. (Wayne) is smart. Be like (Wayne).”

Williams let out his trademark laugh when he saw the sign. The flip side includes the number for Moffat County’s election division and a link to GoVoteColorado.com, where Coloradans can register to vote or update their registration information.

Clerks statewide are nervous that interest in a highly volatile — and unusual — presidential campaign, along with nine statewide ballot measures and local issues and candidates, will result in long lines on Election Day although Colorado is a mail-ballot state. Clerks mail out ballots starting Monday and voter service and polling centers where Coloradans can vote in person open Oct. 24.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Moffat County Clerk Lila Herod in January.
Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Moffat County Clerk Lila Herod in January.

Herod’s staff put a “This is (Lila)” sign outside the courthouse. “I’m waiting for somebody to vandalize it and say, ‘Who said Lila was smart?'” Herod said, with a laugh.

The signs also have been a hit with businesses in Craig, with shopkeepers posting them inside stores with their names penciled in. Some of the signs have drawings of men in pants, others of women in skirts.

“The businesses just love it. They’ve been real supportive,” Herod said. “It’s fun and it’s getting people talking in the community.”