Even without term limits, Colorado lawmakers say good-bye

Not a single House Republican is term limited this year — which is a legislative record — but six of them won’t be coming back anyway.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams with two Senate Democrats who are term limited, Lucia Guzman of Denver and Andy Kerr of Lakewood. (SOS photo)

That’s because five of the GOP members are running for another office and the sixth, Yeullin Willett of Grand Junction, chose not to run again.

Every two years, the House and Senate chambers say good-bye to the members who won’t be back, usually because of term limits, which voters approved in 1990 and went into effect in 1998. House members can serve four, two-year terms, senators can serve two, four-year terms.

On the last day of the 2018 session, on May 9, Willett pointed out how many lawmakers who were sworn in with him in 2015 were already gone, backing up the point made by the late, great political sage, Jerry Kopel.

Former lawmaker Jerry Kopel. (Dave Kopel photo)

“Term limit supporters claim it’s necessary to limit terms so legislators don’t overstay. But a little research casts doubt on the idea that overstaying was ever a problem. It would seem the whole reason for term limits is based on a myth of political junky careerist state legislators,” the former lawmaker wrote in 2008.

Kopel’s research showed that an average of 22 or 23 legislators were gone every two years without term limits being involved. Some died in office, others lost elections. And of course some resigned or chose not to run again.

This year, eight of the Senate’s 35 members are term limited. And 17 of the 65 representatives won’t return to the House next year for one reason or another. Here’s a breakdown of departing lawmakers by chamber and by caucus:

Read moreEven without term limits, Colorado lawmakers say good-bye

The Post: “How Colorado became the safest state to cast a vote”

A story in The Washington Post today about Colorado’s stellar election security has been read far and wide — to the delight of those who handle elections in the Centennial State.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams and the SOS chief information officer Trevor Timmons, have made election security a goal. (SOS office)

“Nationwide, states are taking a variety of measures to bolster their election systems ahead of November, from replacing old equipment to conducting vulnerability tests to hiring new staff,” Post reporter Derek Hawkins wrote. “But few, if any, have gone as far as Colorado has — indeed, many states don’t have the funding to make the upgrades.”

The headline of the article: “How Colorado became the safest state to cast a vote.”

“If people perceive a risk, they’re less likely to participate in voting,” Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams is quoted as saying.  “We want to protect people from that threat, and we want to people to perceive that they are protected from that threat.”

Read moreThe Post: “How Colorado became the safest state to cast a vote”

SBA touts Colorado’s amazing small business success stories

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams, left, and Dan Nordberg, right, the regional director of the U.S. Small Business Administration Region VIII, with the winners of the Colorado Small Business Persons of the Year award, Margot Langstaff and Elisa Hamill with LifeHealth in Littleton. The Colorado-based company provides a range of clinical health services. (SOS photo)

Check out these Small Business Administration loan success stories in Colorado: Otter Box, Chipolte, Snooze, New Belgium Brewing and more.

At an awards ceremony Wednesday in Centennial,  Dan Nordberg, regional director of the SBA’s District VIII, emphasized the impact of small businesses and the SBA in the state.

“Over the last 64 years more than 70,000 Colorado companies have financed their American dream using the SBA’s funding programs,” he said.

The ceremony was part of National Small Business Week, which includes local business events and workshops throughout the state. In addition, each state hands out awards and some recipients are honored at an event in Washington, D.C.

“It was heartwarming to see the successs of these great businesses.  More than a million Coloradans work for the more than 600,000 Colorado small businesses,” noted Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams. “Our office works hard to provide common sense easy filings for every business and nonprofit across the state.”

Read moreSBA touts Colorado’s amazing small business success stories

Secretary Williams doesn’t have a magic wand but …

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Chuck Berry, president of the Colorado Association of Commerce & Industry, at CACI’s board meeting April 19. (SOS photo)

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams told business leaders recently that he and other state officials are working to help create a single system for new businesses to interact with multiple state agencies.

MyBizColorado, when it is unveiled, will be user friendly, intuitive and a more expedient way to register a business and obtain necessary licenses and permits.

“We want to make it easier for business,” Williams told the Colorado Association of Commerce & Industry at a board of directors lunch meeting.

After his talk, Williams was asked, “If you could wave a magic wand to fix a few things what would they be?”

“The ability to get from Colorado Springs to Denver in a shorter amount of time,” said Williams, who commutes on Interstate 25.

Read moreSecretary Williams doesn’t have a magic wand but …

Dogs, desserts and primary ballots — unaffiliated voters, pick just one

A little girl, two Corgis, two delectable desserts and a stuffed donkey and elephant — no wonder a video from the Boulder County Clerk’s office reminding unaffiliated voters about the June 26 primary is so appealing.

The video, which helps promote the Colorado’s Secretary of State’s UChooseCo campaign, opens with the two dogs approaching Beatrix Alexander.

“You can only pet one,” says the narrator, Mircalla Wozniak, the spokeswoman for the Boulder County clerk’s office — and Beatrix’s mother.

Beatrix had to choose between the cupcake. And when it came to the elephant, the Republican, and the donkey, the Democrat, she could only pick one.

That message is a key part of UChooseCO, a campaign that Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams launched in March to help inform unaffiliated voters about their new rights and responsibilities when it comes to primary elections.

Read moreDogs, desserts and primary ballots — unaffiliated voters, pick just one