Bill aimed at 2018 election woes signed into law

Three generations of Nevilles pose with Gov Hickenlooper as he signs an elections measure into law. Also pictured, at right, is Tim Greismer, legislative liaison for the Colorado Secretary of State’s office, and the deputy secretary of state, Suzanne Staiert. (SOS photo)

Gov. John Hickenlooper signed an election petition bill into law designed to prevent some of the problems that plagued last year’s election and thrust a dog named Duke into the limelight.

Under House Bill 1088, the Colorado Secretary of State’s office will conduct signature verification on candidate petitions — previously only the address was checked. It also allows petition circulators to cure administrative deficiencies in their circulator affidavits.

In what is believed to be a legislative first, the measure signed into law was sponsored by a father-son duo. House Minority Leader Patrick Neville, R-Castle Rock, introduced House Bill 1088 with his father, Sen. Tim Neville, R-Littleton. The bill was first heard in committee in March.

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2017 Go Code challenge winners focus on water, noise and farmers

Secretary of State Wayne Williams with Andrew Cole, the program manager for Go Code Colorado, which held its final competition Wednesday night. (SOS photo)

Wednesday marked the end of another successful year for Go Code Colorado, a statewide business app challenge housed in Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams’ office.

After months of preparing, the top 10 teams gave their final pitches to a panel of judges. A member from each team spent five minutes explaining their app idea, followed by a three-minute question-and-answer period.

“I don’t know if this is uniquely Colorado, but it’s the best of Colorado,” Andrew Cole, program manager for Go Code, said after Secretary Williams announced the three winning teams.

The Seawell ballroom at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts filled with cheers from the winning team members and their friends and families, and some groans from those who made it as far as the finale but did not win. Some vowed to return next year.

The three teams — Drip, Hud Buddy and Magpie Supply — will each receive $25,000 contract from the state and a sponsor incentive package.

“I continue to be impressed by the creativity and collaboration of the Go Code Colorado teams,” Secretary Williams said. “Teams continue to show the value of public data if we can get it into the hands of innovative and entrepreneurial people who have a different perspective on how to use it.”

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Peak to Peak High School receives award for voter registration effort

Robin Peterson, a junior at Peak to Peak High School, is flanked by Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert, left, and Ryan Drysdale, Inspire Colorado’s program coordinator.

Another Colorado high school received top honors for voter registration.

Peak to Peak charter school students in Lafayette were the recipients of the Eliza Pickrell Routt award presented by the Colorado Secretary of State’s office.

Robin Peterson, a junior at Peak to Peak, worked with Ryan Drysdale, the program coordinator for Inspire Colorado, and the school’s English teachers to register 85 percent of the senior class and a majority of the junior class. Principal Kyle Mathews praised Robin’s efforts in getting her peers registered to vote.

“She really had her boots on the ground with this,” he said. “She is very civically engaged and brought that political passion to our campus.”

Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert made the trip to Boulder County in the middle of Colorado’s spring snowstorm to present the award to P2P’s juniors and seniors.

“Congratulations to you. This is what democracy is about, being engaged and making a difference in your community,” she said.

The award is named after Eliza Pickrell Routt, wife of Colorado’s first governor, John Long Routt, after whom Routt County is named. She was the first woman to register to vote in Colorado.

Kit Carson and Eads high schools also received the same honor this month. Ouray High School students will be awarded it on Saturday. Last year, Yuma and Eaglecrest high schools were the first recipients of this award.

Wayne Williams focuses on voter confidence at elections summit

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Amber McReynolds, director of Denver Elections, at the GET Summit.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams addressed the issue of trust in elections and what states can do to rebuild confidence when he spoke this week at the first ever Global Election Technology Summit.

The GET Summit was organized by Startup Policy Lab, which invited bi-partisan leaders and innovators in elections, technology and other areas to get their input. Williams was a keynote speaker at the summit held Wednesday and Thursday in  San Francisco.

Colorado is viewed as being on the cutting edge of election technology. In an attempt to move the state from its  checkerboard pattern of voting systems, Williams in 2015 selected Dominion Voting Systems to provide equipment to Colorado’s 64 counties. The selection came after a pilot program and the recommendation of a committee.

In addition, county clerks and their staffs currently are undergoing training to learn how to perform the latest in post-election audits.

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Colorado youth making an effort in voter registration

Secretary Wayne Williams with Kit Carson High School seniors Jaxon Crawford, left, and Bradley Johnson, right, who registered students to vote at Kit Carson and Eads high schools.

Check out the video from Secretary Williams’ day on the eastern plains here.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams shared his high school experience when honoring two Colorado high schools on Wednesday for its effort in registering juniors and seniors to vote.

Students Bradley Johnson (back left) and Jaxon Crawford (back right) look on as Secretary Williams presents the Eliza Pickrell Routt award to Eads High School administrators Dawn James (right), Glenn Smith (center), and Betsy Barnett (left).

Students at Eads and Kit Carson high schools were winners of the Eliza Pickrell Routt Award for Outstanding Voter Registration Efforts from the Secretary of State’s office.

Williams told a story he often tells to groups of young people. His high school in Virginia didn’t have a graduating class in 1959 because the town leaders closed the school rather than follow orders to integrate it.

Twenty years later when Williams attended Warren County High School, the leadership hadn’t improved much.

“I moved there and didn’t like the way the leadership was going so I got involved and I was 16 years old. I got all my friends from the high school and we stood outside all the polling places and we completely changed the leadership for that county for the first time in 100 years,” he said.

“So you can have an impact, even without having the ability to vote.”

Kit Carson seniors Jaxon Crawford and Bradley Johnson worked with the group Inspire Colorado to register 100 percent of the senior class at Kit Carson High.

Secretary Wayne Williams with Kiowa County Clerk and Recorder Delisa Weeks at Eads High School.

Not only did Jaxon and Bradley make the effort at their school, but they went to their rival high school, Eads, to get the juniors and seniors there to register.

“I think that all of us adults can learn a little bit about that bipartisan spirit, that we can engage with the people we compete with,” Ryan Drysdale, Inspire Colorado’s program coordinator said.

The award is named after Eliza Pickrell Routt, wife of Gov. John Long Routt after whom Routt County is named. She was the first woman to register to vote in Colorado.

Ouray High School in Ouray and Peak to Peak High School in Lafayette will receive the same honors later this month. Last year, Yuma High School and Eaglecrest High School were the recipients of this award.

To win, 85 percent or more of eligible students must be registered to vote.

Williams also praised the county clerks that serve those two high schools, saying,  “Their purpose really is to try to make it easy for you to participate in the process and that’s what we try to do, but we need you to step up and make those decisions.”

Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Pat Daugherty, Cheyenne County clerk and recorder, at Kit Carson High School.

Pat Daugherty, Cheyenne county clerk and recorder, spoke briefly to Kit Carson students about her office and how grateful she is for the help she receives from various students and teachers on field trips.

“It’s as hard as showing up and letting somebody know you want to get involved,” she joked. “We gladly accept youth judges in the elections.”

Williams left the seniors with praise for their accomplishments and advice as they set off to their next chapter.

“Take that effort you’ve made and keep going with it as you head off into the world.”