Chauncey Billups: Denver’s “Big Shot”

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and former Mayor Wellington Webb, left, and NBA standout Chauncey Billups and his wife Piper, right, flank Billups’ portrait that was unveiled Tuesday at the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library. (Photo by Josh Miller/Special to the SOS)

Hometown hero Chauncey Billups credited his family and his community for his successes on and off the basketball court when his photograph was unveiled this week at the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library.

The NBA all-star said he plans to bring his daughters to see the library when they are home from college for the holidays and he urged others to visit the library at 2401 Welton St.

Basketball star Chauncey Billups pays tribute to Denver’s first black mayor, Wellington Webb. (Photos by Evan Semón Photography @evansemonphotography #denverEvan)

“My great great grandkids are going to be able to come here and see their old, old man,” Billups said.

“I never dreamed this big, to have something like this. … I’m so proud of where I’m from and who raised me. I appreciate you all supporting me over the years and I love you back.”

He also thanked former Denver Mayor Wellington Webb and Webb’s wife, former state Rep. Wilma Webb, for their efforts in pushing for the construction of the library, where a portion is dedicated to making sure Denver and Colorado’s rich black history is not lost.

“You talk about people who impacted me as a kid?” Billups said. “Having Mayor Webb being a black mayor from the neighborhood instilled in us kids we could do anything.”

Read moreChauncey Billups: Denver’s “Big Shot”

Bold ideas from Boulder County’s elections division

The coasters in action at a Boulder bar that contain voting info for residents of Boulder County. (Matt Benjamin, Facebook photo)

Bolder Boulder refers to a race, but can accurately be applied to the Boulder County elections division, too. This year,the division is giving away coasters, bookmarks, posters and even temporary tattoos that contain election information.

Boulder County Clerk Hillary Hall and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams during a recent visit to her office in Boulder.

“Our office takes voter outreach seriously, and that means reaching voters in unconventional ways and unconventional places,” said Boulder County Clerk Hillary Hall.

“By conducting our outreach in a variety of channels we are helping reinforce the message that voting is a priority. It helps the voter engage in the process, check their registration, and puts election information at their fingertips in a variety of settings.”

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams praised Hall and other clerks for their efforts to boost voter registration and turnout. “There’s a reason we’ve got the highest voter registration in the country, and we’re tops in turnout, too, and innovate ideas such as this are part of our success story.

Read moreBold ideas from Boulder County’s elections division

Justin Pilcher: A short life, well lived

Congressman Ed Perlmutter and his wife Nancy, and political consultant Audrey Kline and her husband Justin Pilcher at the wedding of Rep. Brittany Pettersen and Ian Silverii at the Governor’s Mansion in 2017. Pilcher’s memorial service was Saturday. (SOS photo)

A while back I got into a Twitter spat with Audrey Kline, a great young Democrat I’ve encountered over the years, and when we talked in person about our 140-character standoff she explained her reasoning to me:

Rep. Jessie Danielson holds her daughter Isabelle at a reception following a memorial service for Justin Pilcher Saturday. (SOS photo)

Her husband had a rare form of cancer and where would people be without Obamacare.

Justin Spencer Pilcher died Feb. 25 at the age of 33.

It was standing-room only at his memorial service Saturday at Olinger Crown Hill, and as I looked at the sports paraphernalia and Scouts uniform and the videos, all I could think of was the ending of the indelible movie “Brian’s Song:”

Brian Piccolo died of cancer at the age of 26. He left a wife and three daughters. He also left a great many loving friends who miss and think of him often. But when they think of him, it’s not how he died that they remember — but how he lived. How he did live!”

Read moreJustin Pilcher: A short life, well lived

Secretary Williams visits historic Summit County

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams visits today with the Summit County Clerk & Recorder’s office, including, left, chief deputy clerk Stacey Campbell, and Clerk Kathleen Neel, center. (SOS photo)

Visiting Summit County Clerk Kathleen Neel any time of the year is a treat but in the midst of the Olympics the trip is even more special.

The sign that welcomes visitors exiting Interstate 70 has been changed from “Silverthorne” to “Goldthorne” in honor of local snowboarder Red Gerard, who won a gold medal last Saturday.

From there Williams drove to the county seat of Breckenridge. Summit County was established in 1861 as one of the Colorado Territory’s original 17 counties.

“We had a good visit,” Neel said.”He wanted to make sure we felt we are being taken care of by the Secretary of State’s office — and we do. They never make you feel like you asked a stupid question.”

Summit County Clerk Kathy Neel color codes the voter service and polling centers located in the county. (SOS photo)

Williams has made it a point since he took office in 2015 to visit with all 64 clerks in their offices to see first hand what kind of challenges they face.

Neel and her chief deputy clerk, Stacey Campbell, talked with Williams about a variety of issues, including the nation’s first-ever risk-limiting audit that was completed after the 2017 election.

In addition, they discussed the June 26 primary, which will be the first time unaffiliated voters can automatically participate without officially declaring to be a Republican or a Democrat. They will just select which ballot they want to vote.

“It is a little nerve-wracking,” Neel said, “because we’ve never done an open primary before.”

West Virginia secretary of state ties one on for benefit of Wayne Williams

West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams. (WVA photo) )

West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner showed up at the National Association of Secretaries of State winter conference  Friday with clothing aimed at Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams.

“See this?” Warner asked, as he proudly showed off his green tie with the “M” logo for Marshall University.

Marshall’s Thundering Herd defeated the Colorado State Rams 31-28 in the New Mexico Bowl in Albuquerque last December.

The two secretaries of state waged a friendly bet beforehand: Each would make a $50 donation to a local food bank in the name of the winning team.

“Just make that check out in honor of Marshall Thundering Herd. Send photos — you’ll be a hero in Huntington,” Warner texted Williams afterward. “Then, even you can say, ‘We are all MARSHALL!’”

So Williams got a tiny taste of his own medicine. Two years ago at NASS’ winter conference in D.C., Williams showed up in a Denver Broncos T-shirt, fresh from watching the Super Bowl parade right outside his office in Denver. He wore some kind of Broncos paraphernalia for three straight days.

The secretary of state who had to grin and bear it was North Carolina’s Elaine Marshall. She and Williams also had made a food-bank wager.