Secretary Williams talks to clerks about voter fraud

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams on Wednesday address county clerks on the state’s eastern edge, who were meeting in Sterling for training. (SOS photo)

Check out staffer Julia Sunny’s video on the visit with county clerks from the eastern regional. As Kiowa County Clerk Delisa Weeks says, “We’re small, but we’re fun.” YouTube video.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams addressed the issue of voter fraud when he spoke to county clerks on the Eastern Plains Wednesday, warning them that in the coming months his office could be asking about certain constituents suspected of voting twice in the 2016 election.

“Some of you are aware there were accusations that there was rampant fraud in the elections. Some said there was no fraud,” Williams said. “The answer is somewhere in between.”

Colorado is part of a national months-long check of voter histories that flags the names of voters who appeared to have voted more than once.

“I anticipate there will be some people in Colorado who voted in multiple states. There are not tens of thousands of them. It did not change the result of the election,” Williams said.

“But there are elections that decided by a single vote. I presided over those elections as a county clerk. So we care about that issue. The message from us isn’t that vote fraud never occurs, but we make it difficult to occur and we help prosecute people when we find out about it.”

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Cherry Creek Mall: Didn’t you watch Hickenlooper’s 2003 campaign ad?


John Hickenlooper’s 2003 mayoral ad “Change.”

The headline today on a ColoradoPolitics blog read, “Hyper-local politics in Denver: It’s all about parking,” referring to an “uproar” in Cherry Creek.

“Hel-lo!” Businessman John Hickenlooper taught us that lesson in 2003, when he was one of pack of candidates running in the first open Denver mayor’s race in a dozen years. An early poll showed him tied — for fifth place.

Then came Hickenlooper’s folksy, funny ad featuring his showdown with a parking meter attendant. Hickenlooper used an actual change belt tied to his waist, handed out coins to drivers and even fed money into an expired meter in LoDo.

How good was that ad? Did the spot tap in to the frustration of drivers wanting to hang out in downtown Denver? Well, now we call him Gov. Hickenlooper.

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Secretary Williams visits Fremont County for clerks’ meeting

Secretary of State Wayne Williams is flanked by Fremont County’s chief deputy clerk, Dotty Gardunio, and Clerk Katie Barr. The Fremont County clerk’s office is hosting a regional clerks meeting. (SOS photo)

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams visited scenic, friendly Fremont County twice in two days as county clerks in the southern region are meeting in Cañon City.

Williams addressed the clerks Wednesday morning, answering questions, fielding compliments and talking about how new ballot measures voters passed in 2016 will impact their operations.

“Some of you are wondering will there be an issue on the ballot this November. Why might you care?” Williams asked, and then explained that if a statewide issue is on the ballot then counties get reimbursed from the state some of the costs of running an election.

One proposal going through the legislature would ask voters in November to decide on a sales tax increase to help fix Colorado’s roads. It is sponsored by Cañon City’s own Kevin Grantham, the Senate president and a Republican, and House Speaker Crisanta Duran, a Denver Democrat. The first committee hearing on their proposal, House Bill 1242, is being held today at the state capitol.

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U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner’s son Thatcher steals the show — again

U.S. Sen. Cory and his wife, Jaime, and their children Thatcher, 5, Caitlyn, 2, and Alyson, 13, at the San Luis Valley Lincoln Day Dinner in Alamosa Saturday night. (SOS)

Once again, U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner’s son has upstaged him, this time at the San Luis Valley Lincoln Day Dinner in Alamosa Saturday night.

Two years ago, Thatcher Gardner stole the show from state Senate President Bill Cadman at the Colorado Republican Party’s Centennial Dinner in the metro area. Thatcher was 3 at the time when he kept mimicking Cadman; he’s now 5 as he was happy to remind his dad.

Thatcher Gardner proudly displays where his tooth used to be. (SOS)

Gardner, the featured speaker at the dinner, was telling the crowd about when his son had worked on a school project that asked for favorite color and such. Thatcher, who was seated at the head table, was intent on his computer game.

“I think he was 4 at the time,” Gardner said.

“I’m 5,” Thatcher said, without looking up.

It was the second time the boy addressed the dinner.

The first time was when Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams spoke, after being introduced by Alamosa County Commissioner  Darius Allen, who praised Williams. Allen said when Williams served on the El Paso County Board of Commissioners he looked out for small, rural counties and was the commissioners’ go-to-guy on transportation. Williams talked about elections — and transportation.

“I didn’t care what affiliation the road was when it had a pothole in it,” Williams said, resulting in a big “Ha!” from Thatcher that drew a laugh from the crowd.

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Wayne Williams: ‘The people who won the election, won the election’

Secretary of State Wayne Williams on Tuesday addressed the Colorado Springs Chamber & EDC and Leadership Pikes Peak. (SOS photo)

By Lynn Bartels
and Julia Sunny

Secretary of State Wayne Williams preached to the choir on Tuesday, telling his fellow Colorado Springs brethren that Colorado’s transportation woes aren’t good for the economy.

“My wife’s from Utah so I get to go over to Utah frequently and I drive this 10-lane interstate that exists between their equivalent of Colorado Springs, which is Provo, and Salt Lake, which is their equivalent of Denver,” he said. “We have four (lanes). They have 10. We have almost twice as many people. See if that math makes sense to you. It doesn’t to me. ”

He knows first hand: He still lives in Colorado Springs and has to make that “really crappy drive” on Interstate 25 to his office in Denver.

Lobbyist Joan Green and Rep. Paul Lundeen, R-Monument.

Williams said once when he was flying out of Salt Lake City he asked some skiers at the airport, “Why Utah?” Their answer: They can get to the slopes faster than flying into Denver.

“That’s something we have to address as a state for our continued economic viability,” he said.

Williams, a former El Paso County commissioner and clerk, addressed the Colorado Springs Chamber & EDC and Leadership Pike Peaks at a lunch at History Colorado before group members headed to the state Capitol for their 2017 Day at the Capitol.

The secretary of state spoke on familiar topics, including election integrity.

“Here in Colorado,” he said, “I can assuredly tell you that the people who won the election, won the election.”

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