Denver Press Club’s Gridiron shows zings EPA, Tom Brady and others

Denver City Council members Kevin Flynn, Robin Kniech and Mary Beth Susman perform at the Denver Press Club's annual Gridiron Show Friday night at the University of Denver's Reiman Theater. (Photo courtesy of Brendan McCaw Photography)
Denver City Council members Kevin Flynn, Robin Kniech and Mary Beth Susman perform at the Denver Press Club’s annual Gridiron Show Friday night at the University of Denver’s Reiman Theater. (Photo courtesy of Brendan McCaw Photography)

The Environmental Protection Agency and Gov. Chris Christie’s bridge controversy  provided grist Friday for the Denver Press Club’s annual Gridiron Show, which spoofs politicians and political happenings in song and skit.

The show  featured Gov. John Hickenlooper and the Hicktones, singing “Sweet Second Term” to “Sweet Caroline.”

Former Denver Post reporter, Fred Brown, known for his style and his stanzas, moderated the event, which was held at the Reiman Theater on the University of Denver campus. Brown’s limerick on outgoing Speaker John Boehner got a huge laugh:

For years now it couldn’t be plainer
The Tea Party hated John Boehner
   They wanted, as speaker,
   Someone stronger, not weaker,
Or really, just someone insane-er. 

Read moreDenver Press Club’s Gridiron shows zings EPA, Tom Brady and others

Colorado county clerks: thinking outside the box regarding the box

Logan County has gone to drive-by voting, with Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon installing a new ballot drop box that allows voters to pull up and drop off their ballots.

Logan County Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon demonstrates how the new drop box can be closed and locked for times when there are deadlines for official documents, like ballots or tax payments. (Photo courtesy of Sara Waite / Sterling Journal-Advocate)
Logan County Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon demonstrates how the new drop box can be closed and locked. (Photo courtesy of Sara Waite / Sterling Journal-Advocate)

Bacon also got the OK from Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams’ office to make it a “multi-use box” so that county residents can drop off their motor-vehicle registrations.

Other county clerks also use 24-hour ballot boxes, which under secretary of state rules must be monitored by surveillance cameras with the data being preserved for 25 months.  It is illegal to drop off more than 10 ballots at a time, and the outside of the envelopes must be signed by the voter in order to  be counted, state  elections director Judd Choate said.

According to the Sterling-Journal Advocate, Bacon also reached out to the other county departments, with Treasurer Patty Bartlett believing the box would be useful for receiving tax payments. Bacon said residents can drop off correspondence for any county office, such as a letter to the county commissioners.

“Whatever is in there,'” Bacon told the newspaper, “we’ll make sure it gets to whatever county office it needs to.”

Here’s a look at ballot-box practices in some other counties, per their clerks or election officials:

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Pueblo County Clerk Bo Ortiz sets up shop at chile festival

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams on Saturday dropped by the voter registration booth set up at Pueblo's Chili & Frijoles Festival. Manning the booth were staffers Ralph Valdez, Clerk and Recorder Bo Ortiz and Shawna Vigil.
Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams on Saturday dropped by the voter registration booth set up at Pueblo’s Chili & Frijoles Festival. Manning the booth were staffers Ralph Valdez, Clerk and Recorder Bo Ortiz and Shawna Vigil.

Pueblo County Clerk Bo Ortiz is taking advantage of two events that cross paths in September: National Voter Registration Month and the Pueblo Chili & Frijoles Festival.

Ortiz told The Pueblo Chieftain he hopes to register 500 voters during the festival, which begins Friday and continues through Sunday.

Pueblo has 90,079 active voters, according to the Colorado Secretary of State’s Office. Of that, 44 percent are Democrats, 30 percent are unaffiliated, 25 percent are Republican and the rest belong to minor parties.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams participated in a variety of events Tuesday as part of National Voter Registration Day. Coloradans who want to register to vote or make sure their address is correct — ballots are mailed, but not forwarded — can go to GoVoteColorado.com.

 

Secretary Wayne Williams discusses Nov. 3 election with county clerks

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams, center, and county clerks from the state's mountain region, met Wednesday in Rifle. They are standing in front of the stained glass window in the Rifle Library that commemorates Theodore Roosevelt's visits to the area.
Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams, center, and county clerks from the state’s mountain region, met Wednesday in Rifle. They are standing in front of the stained glass window in the Rifle Library that commemorates Theodore Roosevelt’s visits to the area.
Members of the Secretary of State's employee relations committee serve up pancakes to the staff Wednesday morning as part of an office fundraiser. They are, from left to right
Members of the Secretary of State’s employee relations committee serve up pancakes to the staff Wednesday morning as part of an office fundraiser. They are, from left to right, Abbas Montoya, Kris Reynolds, Jan Perry and Lynn Waring.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams hit the road again on Wednesday, this time heading to Rifle to meet with the mountain region county clerks at their fall meeting.

Williams already has traveled to Limon to meet with clerks from the eastern side of the state and to Alamosa to meet with clerks from the south.

But going to Rifle meant Williams missed the Colorado Secretary of State’s office breakfast sponsored by the Employee Relations Committee. Plenty of pancakes for $1.50 and two pieces of bacon for 50 cents.  It was the perfect way to start the first day of fall.

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Secretary Wayne Williams shows how easy it is to register to vote in Colorado

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, Denver Clerk and Recorder Debra Johnson and Secretary of State Wayne Williams celebrate National Voter Registration Day on Tuesday. (Lynn Bartels)
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, Denver Clerk and Recorder Debra Johnson and Secretary of State Wayne Williams celebrate National Voter Registration Day on Tuesday. (Lynn Bartels)

Hats off to Secretary of State Wayne Williams, who spent a chunk of Tuesday talking about why voting matters and how easy it is to register to vote in Colorado, and then topped it off by starring in a voter-video set to  “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae).”

Tuesday was National Voter Registration Day, where the importance of voting was stressed at events throughout the country.

When Williams served as El Paso County clerk and recorder, two school board races in 2013 were decided by a single vote, he said at various events.

Williams left his Colorado Springs house early Tuesday to arrive at CBS Denver at 6:15 a.m. He capped off the day at the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library in historic Five Points where a voter-registration event was hosted by Black Women for Positive Change, an international group. The chairman of the Colorado chapter is Patricia Duncan, whose late sister, Secretary of State Vikki Buckley, died in office in 1999.

“Colorado makes it extraordinarily easy to vote,” Williams said, asking library participants to get out their smart phones.

Read moreSecretary Wayne Williams shows how easy it is to register to vote in Colorado