Steffan Tubbs to host fundraiser Wednesday to support vets film

Journalist and author Steffan Tubbs.
Journalist and author Steffan Tubbs.

Journalist Steffan Tubbs is at it again with another film about veterans, this time on PTSD or post traumatic stress disorder.

“ACRONYM: The Cross-Generational Battle With PTSD” takes a look at veterans from every war since World War II and the common bond they share: the demons of war.

Steffan Tubbs is hosting a fundraiser Wednesday night.
Steffan Tubbs is hosting a fundraiser Wednesday night.

Tubbs, co-host of 850 KOA’s morning show, is hosting a wine, chocolate and art fundraiser from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday in Cherry Creek to help raise money to offset the production costs of ACRONYM.  Tickets for the fundraiser are $40 per person and $75 for couples. The event is being held at Fascination St. Fine Art, 315 Detroit St.

Tubb’s first film, “Life, Liberty & Resilience,” explored how the grandson of a slave overcame extremism racism and joined the segregated U.S.  Navy, shipping out to Iwo Jima in 1945 and eventually ending up in Denver. Tubbs also wrote a book by the same name.

ACRONYM will be comprised of four basic sections, according to Mountain Time Media. Here’s what it says on its website about the film:

1)  We will introduce the viewer to each veteran, hear their background stories and learn about the events that have led to their diagnosis;

2)  We’ll learn from doctors, psychiatrists and other leading experts what happens within the brain that causes PTSD and triggers PTSD symptoms;

3)  The documentary will also present different treatment options, both traditional methods and promising non-traditional techniques; and

4)  Finally, we will bring these warriors together for the first time and hear, in group discussions, their triumphs and struggles, heartbreak and sacrifice.

The film will debut on Veterans Day.

 

Gov. John Hickenlooper’s “Sweet Second Term” (Bom, bom, bom)

Gov. John Hickenlooper and the Hick-tones perform at the Denver Press Club's annual Gridiron Show. From left to right, Hickenlooper, Left to right:
Gov. John Hickenlooper and the Hick-tones perform at the Denver Press Club’s annual Gridiron Show. From left to right, Hickenlooper, Sabrina D’Agosta, Sarah Moss, Tom Scharf, Bob Rebholtz and Tom Clark. (Photo courtesy of the Hick-tones.)

Gov. John Hickenlooper admits he doesn’t have much of a voice, but he and the Hick-Tones, the group that backs him up every year at the Denver Press Club’s annual Gridiron Show, once again put together a heck of a performance, this year to the tune of “Sweet Caroline.”

It all began/Back at my little brewpub/Playin’ pool and slingin’ beer

Entrepreneur/Mayor and then the guv’na/I can’t sing but I’m still here

Hands/Shaking hands/Creatin’ jobs … for you and me/

Sweet state of mine (bom, bom, bom)/Colorado you’re so good/

Broncos front line (bom, bom, bom) Just ain’t working like it should/

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Sen. Pat Steadman: Meet the people who want to be the next me

Erin Bennet, state director of the Colorado chapter of 9to5, at a rally at the state Capitol. (Bennett campaign photo)
Erin Bennet, state director of the Colorado chapter of 9to5, at a rally at the state Capitol. (Bennett campaign photo)

State Sen. Pat Steadman does most of the talking at his town halls, but on Monday he’s going to give three Denver Democrats vying for his seat a chance to make their case.

Steadman said next year is going to be “all about” the race for president and U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet’s re-election bid.

“Not enough attention is paid to state legislative races,” he said, when asked about hosting the candidate forum.

“Now is the perfect time to ask people to learn more about candidates who want to represent them in the state legislature. It’s a public service.”

Sen. Pat Steadman, left, had endorsed Steve Sherick, right, in the race got his legislative seat. (Sherick campaign photo)
Sen. Pat Steadman, left, had endorsed Steve Sherick, right, in the race got his legislative seat. (Sherick campaign photo)
Gov. John HIckenlooper, left, has endorsed state Rep. Lois Court for Senate District 31. (Court campaign photo)
Gov. John HIckenlooper, left, has endorsed state Rep. Lois Court for Senate District 31. (Court campaign photo)

Steadman is term limited after 2016. Running for his seat are Erin Bennett, the state director of the Colorado chapter of  9to5, state Rep. Lois Court and emergency room doctor Steve Sherick.  Steadman raised some eyebrows earlier this week by endorsing Sherick with the town hall just days away. The endorsement was first reported by The Denver Post’s John Frank, who noted Steadman passed over his legislative colleague.

Steadman told the SOS he originally planned to hold the Senate District 31 town hall last month, and didn’t want to hold off any longer on endorsing Sherick.

The forum  will be held at the Eisenhower Chapel at Lowry, 293 Roslyn St. Doors open at 6:15 p.m. Monday, and the event begins at 7 p.m. and is scheduled to end at 8 p.m.

Denver Press Club’s Gridiron shows zings EPA, Tom Brady and others

Denver City Council members Kevin Flynn, Robin Kniech and Mary Beth Susman perform at the Denver Press Club's annual Gridiron Show Friday night at the University of Denver's Reiman Theater. (Photo courtesy of Brendan McCaw Photography)
Denver City Council members Kevin Flynn, Robin Kniech and Mary Beth Susman perform at the Denver Press Club’s annual Gridiron Show Friday night at the University of Denver’s Reiman Theater. (Photo courtesy of Brendan McCaw Photography)

The Environmental Protection Agency and Gov. Chris Christie’s bridge controversy  provided grist Friday for the Denver Press Club’s annual Gridiron Show, which spoofs politicians and political happenings in song and skit.

The show  featured Gov. John Hickenlooper and the Hicktones, singing “Sweet Second Term” to “Sweet Caroline.”

Former Denver Post reporter, Fred Brown, known for his style and his stanzas, moderated the event, which was held at the Reiman Theater on the University of Denver campus. Brown’s limerick on outgoing Speaker John Boehner got a huge laugh:

For years now it couldn’t be plainer
The Tea Party hated John Boehner
   They wanted, as speaker,
   Someone stronger, not weaker,
Or really, just someone insane-er. 

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Colorado county clerks: thinking outside the box regarding the box

Logan County has gone to drive-by voting, with Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon installing a new ballot drop box that allows voters to pull up and drop off their ballots.

Logan County Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon demonstrates how the new drop box can be closed and locked for times when there are deadlines for official documents, like ballots or tax payments. (Photo courtesy of Sara Waite / Sterling Journal-Advocate)
Logan County Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon demonstrates how the new drop box can be closed and locked. (Photo courtesy of Sara Waite / Sterling Journal-Advocate)

Bacon also got the OK from Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams’ office to make it a “multi-use box” so that county residents can drop off their motor-vehicle registrations.

Other county clerks also use 24-hour ballot boxes, which under secretary of state rules must be monitored by surveillance cameras with the data being preserved for 25 months.  It is illegal to drop off more than 10 ballots at a time, and the outside of the envelopes must be signed by the voter in order to  be counted, state  elections director Judd Choate said.

According to the Sterling-Journal Advocate, Bacon also reached out to the other county departments, with Treasurer Patty Bartlett believing the box would be useful for receiving tax payments. Bacon said residents can drop off correspondence for any county office, such as a letter to the county commissioners.

“Whatever is in there,'” Bacon told the newspaper, “we’ll make sure it gets to whatever county office it needs to.”

Here’s a look at ballot-box practices in some other counties, per their clerks or election officials:

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