Secretary Wayne Williams’ Denver Broncos shirt elicits cheers in D.C.

Congressman Ken Buck, Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Buck chief of staff Mac Zimmerman at Buck's DC office on Tuesday. His staff let out a cheer when they saw Williams' T-shirt.
Congressman Ken Buck, Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Buck chief of staff Mac Zimmerman at Buck’s D.C. office on Tuesday. Buck’s staff let out a cheer when they saw Williams’ T-shirt.
Congressman Doug Lamborn, right, and his wife Jeanne, had some fun when they saw fellow Colorado Springs Republican Wayne Williams sporting a Denver Broncos championship shirt.
Congressman Doug Lamborn, right, and his wife Jeanie had some fun when they saw fellow Colorado Springs Republican Wayne Williams sporting a Denver Broncos championship shirt.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams missed today’s Super Bowl parade in Denver, but he got a warm welcome in Washington, D.C., with his Denver Broncos championship T-shirt.

The parade route went right by Williams’ office at 1700 Broadway — he captured a good picture of the orange- and blue-stripe painted on the street for his Facebook page — but he was headed to Washington for the National Association of Secretaries of State winter conference.

After he landed, Williams stopped by all seven congressional offices. In most cases, the representatives had had already headed to the floor for a nighttime vote, but the secretary did manage to catch up with two lawmakers, Republican Ken Buck of Windsor and Republican Doug Lamborn of Colorado Springs.

Williams also had a chance to meet Buck’s new chief of staff, Mac Zimmerman, on his first day on the job. Zimmerman grew up in Denver but has lived in Grand Junction and previously worked for Congressmen Scott McInnis and Tom Tancredo, and for state Senate Minority Leader Josh Penry.

Zimmerman once worked with Buck’s previous chief of staff, former state Sen. Greg Brophy.

Miles, mascot of the Denver Broncos, enjoys today's Super Bowl parade in Denver.
Miles, mascot of the Denver Broncos, enjoys today’s Super Bowl parade in Denver.

Denver Broncos: a season full of twists, turns and an amazing conclusion. Sound familiar?

The Denver Broncos celebrate their victory over the New England Patriots in the AFC championship game Sunday Jan. 14, sending them to the Super Bowl. From left to right are No. 92 Sylvester Williams, No. 16 Bernie Fowler and No. 23 Ronnie Hillamn. Photo by Evan Semón for CBS4/Special to the Colorado Secretary of State)
The Denver Broncos celebrate their victory over the New England Patriots in the AFC championship game Sunday Jan. 14, sending them to Super Bowl 50. From left to right are No. 92 Sylvester Williams, No. 23 Ronnie Hillman and No. 16 Bernie Fowler. (Photo by Evan Semón for CBS4/Special to the Colorado Secretary of State)

“I’ll never forget Elway with the guys carrying him on their shoulders and all the confetti. He was crying. That was about the point it hit me.”

One of my favorite stories about the Denver Broncos’ first Super Bowl win in 1998 was written a decade later, looking back at the wild run that  ended with a victory over the Green Bay Packers.

In 2007, wide receiver Rod Smith compared the 1997 season to recess.

“You go to school in the morning and they ring the bell for recess and then they didn’t ring the second bell for you to go in,” he said at the time. “I swear, the whole year was like recess.”

The Broncos play in their eighth Super Bowl Sunday, taking on the Carolina Panthers. Here’s hoping that in 2025, there’s a story written about this magical season and how the Broncos won their third Super Bowl.

And let’s not forget how a Super Bowl bet this year between Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams and North Carolina Secretary of State Elaine Marshall benefited the hungry.

Here’s the 10-year anniversary story, which appeared on Sept. 5, 2007:

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Secretary of State Wayne Williams unloads 674 pounds of food as part of Super Bowl bet

Rick Enstrom of Enstrom Candies and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams at the Food Bank of the Rockies this morning with the 674 pounds of food donated by the candy company. It's part of a Super Bowl wager between Williams and North Carolina Secretary of State Elaine Marshall.
Rick Enstrom of Enstrom Candies and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams at the Food Bank of the Rockies this morning with the 674 pounds of food donated by the candy company. It’s part of a Super Bowl wager between Williams and North Carolina Secretary of State Elaine Marshall.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams’ bet that the Denver Broncos will beat the Carolina Panthers in Sunday’s Super Bowl netted in 674 pounds of groceries being dropped off this morning at Food Bank of the Rockies.

And more food is coming.

Today’s food was donated by by Enstrom Candies, who got in on the secretary’s bet. In addition to tuna, peanut butter and cans of sweet corn, the company contributed some of its famous toffee — 2,000 individual candy bars to be exact.

“Take that, Carolina Panthers!” Rick Enstrom said, as he and Williams helped unload food from the back of his truck.

Williams and North Carolina Secretary of State Elaine Marshall are helping out the hungry with their Super Bowl bet. Each office will collect food to be donated to their respective food banks, Food Bank of the Rockies and Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina. The donations will be made in the name of the winning team, which Williams predicts will be the Denver Broncos.

In addition to the secretary of state’s office, Denver Clerk Debra Johnson and Arapahoe Clerk Matt Crane and their staffs also are collecting food items and will add them to the Colorado Secretary of State’s haul.  The donations will be delivered to Food Bank of the Rockies next week.

Members of the Colorado Secretary of State's Human Resources Committee, along with businessman Rick Enstrom and Secretary of Wayne Williams. The committee is helping organize the office's food drive as part of a Super Bowl bet. From left to right: Kristine Reynolds, Cheryl Hodges, Enstrom, Lynn Waring, Secretary Williams, Janet Perry and Abbas Montoya.
Members of the Colorado Secretary of State’s Employee Relations Committee, along with businessman Rick Enstrom and Secretary of Wayne Williams. The committee is helping organize the office’s food drive as part of a Super Bowl bet. From left to right: Kristine Reynolds, Cheryl Hodges, Enstrom, Lynn Waring, Secretary Williams, Janet Perry and Abbas Montoya.

Colorado Secretary of State staffers serve up chicken, cheer at Ronald McDonald House

Colorado Secretary of State staffers served up a hot meal to residents at the Ronald McDonald House in Denver. From left to right: Ben Schler, Kathryn Mikeworth, Kyle Dostart, Hilary Rudy and Minerva Padron.
Colorado Secretary of State staffers served up a hot meal to residents at the Ronald McDonald House in Denver. From left to right: Ben Schler, Kathryn Mikeworth, Kyle Dostart, Hilary Rudy and Minerva Padron.

By Keara Brosnan

Colorado’s Secretary of State’s office employees trekked through the snow Sunday to serve an evening meal for residents at the Ronald McDonald House in Denver.

“They thought with the weather we might change our plans, but they were so appreciative that we didn’t,” said Hilary Rudy, deputy director of elections. “It was a lot of fun and well worth it.”

Rudy and her colleagues bought chicken, mashed potatoes, salad and cookies with money from the office’s Employee Relations Committee. She estimated they served around 55 people.

Colorado Secretary of State staffers Kyle Dostart and Ben Schler have some fun while getting a meal ready for residents at the Ronald McDonald House in Denver.
Colorado Secretary of State staffers Kyle Dostart and Ben Schler have some fun while getting a meal ready for residents at the Ronald McDonald House in Denver.

“What we learned was to buy more chicken than you think you need and then double that,” Rudy said with a laugh.

Rudy had heard about the volunteer opportunity through a friend and noted that it was easy to sign up online through the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Denver website.

“It was great,” staffer Ben Schler said. “It was fun. I’d do it again.”

Holly Sullivan, one of the two house managers at the Ronald McDonald House of Denver, said a wide variety of groups volunteer to provide families with a warm dinner. Sometimes families cook for the residents and other times it’s members of Greek life, sports teams or clubs.

Families nationwide stay at the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Denver while their children receive treatment at local hospitals.

“We couldn’t do this without the support of our community,” Holly Sullivan said. “Families spend so much time at the hospital and maybe they snack at the hospital, but they come back to our facility and to eat a home-cooked meal is special.

“It’s a special time where families get to meet other families and know that they are not isolated.”

Keara Brosnan is a University of Denver student interning with the Colorado Secretary of State’s Office.

Secretary Williams touts one-time rival, Joe Neguse, for cabinet post

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams presents his one-time campaign rival, Joe Neguse, for confirmation as head of the Department of Regulatory Agencies before a Senate committee Wednesday.
Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams presents his one-time campaign rival, Joe Neguse, for confirmation as head of the Department of Regulatory Agencies before a Senate committee Wednesday.

They campaigned against each other for secretary of state, but on Wednesday Republican Wayne Williams and Democrat Joe Neguse sat side by side in a Senate confirmation hearing, praising each other.

Williams, who beat Neguse by 2.2 percentage points, took office in January 2015. Gov. John Hickenlooper last spring appointed Neguse to head the Department of Regulatory Agencies, better known as DORA. The post requires Senate confirmation, which is why Neguse appeared before the state Senate Business, Labor and Technology Committee.

Neguse sailed through the hearing after Williams and members of the Republican-controlled committee praised his performance. Neguse’s confirmation now goes before the full Senate where it has been deemed such a sure thing it was put on what is called the consent calendar, where all 35 senators are expected to be “yes” votes.

“Politics often sounds nasty,” Williams said, referring to the recent Iowa caucus.

“And that’s a different level of dialogue than Americans and Coloradans really want and I am here as kind  of a testament that you can run a campaign without wallowing in the mud or engaging in rancor.  Joe and I had the opportunity to both run for secretary of state for more than a year and as we went across the state and showed up at different forums. There were some things we disagreed on but there were also a lot of things we agreed on. And we did throughout the campaign keep it civil.”

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