Happy Trails, Keara Brosnan

Keara Brosnan, center, served as an intern and aide for the Colorado Secretary of State office's communications department. She is touring the award-winning Ink Monstr in this photo from the company.
Keara Brosnan, center, served as an intern and aide for the Colorado Secretary of State office’s communications department. She is touring the award-winning Ink Monstr in this photo from the company.

Today I say good-bye to my intern, my techie and my friend. I’ll miss you Keara Brosnan.

You know you’ve selected the right intern when you both quote the same lines from “Napoléon Dynamite,” including, “Tina, you fat lard. Come get some dinner.”

When Keara came to the Secretary of  State’s office for her interview last fall she said everybody calls her Kiki because no one can pronounced Keara. I should have taken that as a clue but I insisted we go with Keara. I found myself saying over and over again, “Key,” like a car key, “air,” like what we breathe, “uh,” as in uh huh.

By the time she accompanied Secretary of State Wayne Williams last month on a breathtakingly beautiful road trip — Hinsdale, Rio Grande and Garfield counties — he almost had the name down.

Keara, 22, graduated from the University of Denver in March with a degree in strategic communications. She is from the bay area in California.

Read moreHappy Trails, Keara Brosnan

Republican U.S. Senate ballot: Darryl Glenn’s name is first

The primary election is June 28.
The primary election is June 28.

UPDATE:  Ryan Frazier’s name will be on the Republican Senate primary ballot but the votes will not be counted if a judge determines he should not have made the ballot.

If former Aurora City Councilman Ryan Frazier makes the ballot, his name will be second on the list for Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate in a race rife with unexpected twists and turns.

El Paso County Commissioner Darryl Glenn’s name will be first because he made the ballot at the state Republican assembly in a stunner: Glenn received so many delegate votes that that no one else competing at the assembly survived. Pueblo West resident Jerry Eller got less than 1 percent of the vote at the assembly but  has filed paperwork to become a write-in candidate.

The other way to get on the Senate ballot is by collecting 1,500 valid Republican voter signatures in each of the state’s seven congressional districts. The Colorado Secretary of State’s office held a drawing for those candidates to determine ballot order. This is how the ballot will look, pending Frazier’s appeal after the office deemed he fell short:

  1. Glenn
  2. Frazier
  3. Colorado Springs businessman Robert Blaha
  4. Former CSU athletic director Jack Graham
  5. Former state Rep. Jon Keyser
  6. Write-in candidate_____________

Read moreRepublican U.S. Senate ballot: Darryl Glenn’s name is first

Secretary Wayne Williams encourages Inspire Colorado members

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams is flanked by Cherry Creek High School students at the Inspire Colorado awards dinner Sunday at History Colorado. From left to right: Patrick Neuens, Sarah Hait, Williams, Kara Henry and Julie Phillips.
Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams is flanked by Cherry Creek High School students at the Inspire Colorado awards dinner Sunday at History Colorado. From left to right: Patrick Neuens, Sarah Hait, Williams, Kara Henry and Julie Phillips. (SOS photo)

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams urged high school students with Inspire Colorado to stay involved in democracy even after they graduate from high school.

He said they could volunteer with a campaign or march in a parade.

Eaglecrest High School students Josh Rasp and Kara Hancock at the Inspire Colorado dinner, where Rasp received an award. (SOS photo.)
Eaglecrest High School students Josh Rasp and Kara Hancock at the Inspire Colorado dinner, where Rasp received an award. (SOS photo.)

“You have a chance to continue to make a difference,” Williams said during Inspire Colorado’s awards dinner Sunday night at History Colorado. “That is my hope for you.”

It was the third time that Williams has addressed the group since its inception last year. The nonpartisan organization works with high school juniors and seniors to prepare them for the responsibility of voting as they began to reach eligibility, at age 18. Members do that by registering their fellow students to vote and doing get-out-the-vote efforts for elections.

The youth-led group recently hosted a candidate forum at History Colorado, where Williams also spoke.

Yuma High School seniors Navil Babonoyaba, Rubi Rodriquez and Andrea Hermosillo with Josh Hardesty, the program coordinator for Inspire Colorado. Hermosillo won an award from the group. (SOS photo)
Yuma High School seniors Navil Babonoyaba, Rubi Rodriquez and Andrea Hermosillo with Josh Hardesty, the program coordinator for Inspire Colorado. Hermosillo won an award from the group. (SOS photo)

At the dinner, attended by students and their families, Inspire Colorado handed out two Outstanding Inspired Leader Awards.

Eaglecrest High School junior Josh Rasp got almost 90 percent of the senior class to register to vote. Eaglecrest is in Centennial.  Yuma High School senior Andrea Hermosillo got almost 95 percent.

Rasp attended the event with his parents and brother Jake and his girlfriend Kara Hancock.

Hermosillo attend with fellow Yuma students Navil Babonoyaba and Rubi Rodriguez. Both Hermosillo and Babonoyaba addressed the Inspire Colorado crowd.

Secretary Wayne Williams addresses Greeley Centennial Rotary

Weld County Assessor Chris Woodruff, Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Greeley Mayor Tom Norton at the Greeley Centennial Rotary meeting last week. (SOS photo)
Weld County Assessor Chris Woodruff, Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams and Greeley Mayor Tom Norton at the Greeley Centennial Rotary meeting last week. (SOS photo)

By Keara Brosnan

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams wowed them at the Greeley Centennial Rotary club meeting — and that’s according to the guy who use to have “fun arguments” with Williams over transportation.

Greeley Mayor Tom Norton invited Williams to speak at the club’s meeting last Thursday.

Norton ran the Colorado Department of Transportation under former Gov. Bill Owens. Williams got plenty of transportation experience during his two terms as an El Paso County commissioner. He served on the Colorado State Transportation Advisory Committee, and chaired the Pikes Peak Rural Transportation Authority.

“I joke I was head of CDOT as a punishment from Bill Owens,” Norton said at the Rotary meeting. The two served together in the state Senate, where Norton was Senate president.

As for Williams, Norton said, “We’ve had some fun arguments over transportation.”

Read moreSecretary Wayne Williams addresses Greeley Centennial Rotary

Take Your Child to meet Secretary of State Wayne Williams

Secretary of State Wayne Williams with some of the children and relatives of staffers who participated in the 2016 Take Your Child To Work Day.
Secretary of State Wayne Williams with some of the children and relatives of staffers who participated in the 2016 Take Your  Child To Work Day.

The kids who came to the Colorado Secretary of State’s office for Take Your Child Day made their choices for president known: eight votes for Hillary Clinton and four for Ted Cruz.

In addition to participating in a mock primary and general election, the children — ranging in ages from 17 to 7 — enjoyed a pancake breakfast, a visit with Secretary of State Wayne Williams and a tour of the state Capitol this morning.

Williams, who has four children, easily chatted with the youngsters.

Secretary of State staffer Abbas Montoya makes pancakes with the help of his children, Abbas Jr. 13, and Namira, 15.
Secretary of State staffer Abbas Montoya makes pancakes with the help of his children, Abbas Jr. 13, and Namira, 15.

For the elections, the children watched videos of the candidates and made their choices known in their primary.

Clinton beat Bernie Sanders seven votes to five votes. Cruz took first place with five votes in the GOP primary, while John Kasich received four votes and Trump three. Then it was on to the general election.

Afterward, 8-year-old-old Will Polk, the stepson of staffer Melissa Polk in elections, had a question for elections director Judd Choate.

“Do our votes count?” he wanted to know.

“He was very disappointed when I said, ‘No,'” Choate relayed, adding he told the children they could register to vote when they were 16 and vote at age 18.

Rich Schliep, the information security officer for the Colorado Secretary of State, and his three children: Tyler, 13, and twins Brooke and Hailey, 8.
Rich Schliep, the information security officer for the Secretary of State, and his three children: Tyler, 13, and twins Brooke and Hailey, 8.

Rich Schliep said his son Tyler, 13, enjoyed learning about “signature verification.”

There’s a lot of talk about that these days in the office because of efforts by four Republicans to get on the U.S. Senate primary ballot through voter signatures.

On a personal note, I brought my niece Polly, who turned 10 today, and nephew Max, 11. On the drive in, I told them my boss was 6-feet-4.

“Is he scary?” Max wanted to know.

“No, he’s really nice,” said Polly, who has met Williams before.

Here are the children who are in the photograph with Secretary Williams:

Back row: Namira and Abbas Jr., children of Abbas Montoya; Williams; and Tyler Schliep, son of Rich Schliep.

Secondish row, the three to the left: Max and Polly Bungum, nephew and niece of Lynn Bartels; and Lily Bryant, daughter of Albert Bryant.

First row: Ali Mikeworth, daughter of Kathryn Mikeworth; Ethan and Cassidy Fletcher, grandchildren of Lynn Waring; Jackie Choate, daughter of Judd Choate; Will Polk, stepson of Melissa Polk; and twins Hailey and Brooke Schliep.