Colorado secretary of state visits Mesa County

Secretary of State Wayne Williams on Monday visited Mesa County Clerk and Recorder Sheila Rainer and elections director Amanda Polson. Mesa is one of eight counties involved in a pilot program testing voting equipment in the Nov. 3 election.
Secretary of State Wayne Williams on Monday visited Mesa County Clerk and Recorder Sheila Reiner and elections director Amanda Polson. Mesa is one of eight counties involved in a pilot program testing voting equipment in the Nov. 3 election.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams dropped by the Mesa County clerk and recorder’s office on Monday to visit with clerk Sheila Reiner and discuss voting equipment the county will be using on Nov. 3.

Mesa County is one of eight volunteer counties that is testing equipment from four different voting-machine companies. Each of the four vendors is operating in one large county and a smaller county. Dominion is providing the equipment used in Denver and Mesa counties.

The system must be able to process mail ballots and allow for in-person voting for those who still mark their ballots in person at county polling centers, Williams said.

The other companies and the counties they are partnered with are: Clear Ballot, Adams and Gilpin; ES&S in Jefferson and Teller; and Hart Intercivic in Douglas and Garfield.

The state is looking to eventually adopt a uniform voting system.

Reiner praised the secretary of state.

“Wayne’s accessible. He’s been a good partner,” she said.

Williams will be in Alamosa Tuesday for the fall conference for the southern county clerks.  He was in Limon last week for the fall conference for the eastern county clerks.

On the road again: Secretary Wayne Williams swings through Colorado

Board of Education member Joyce Rankin from the 3rd Congressional District and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams have some fun Friday night posing in front of Lockheed Martin's photo screen at Club 20's steak fry in Grand Junction. (Joe Rice, Lockheed Martin)
Board of Education member Joyce Rankin from the 3rd Congressional District and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams have some fun Friday night posing in front of Lockheed Martin’s photo screen at Club 20’s steak fry in Grand Junction. (Joe Rice, Lockheed Martin)

Friday was a long day for Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams, who attended a court hearing in  Denver in the morning, met with two county clerks on the Western Slope in the afternoon and then attended Club 20’s steak fry at its fall meeting in Grand Junction that night.

Next week Williams heads to the San Luis Valley for the southern region’s county clerks fall conference in Alamosa. On Thursday he was in Limon for the fall conference of the eastern region’s county clerks.

Williams, who took office in January, has been traveling the state meeting with clerks, including some who were elected last year and who will be conducting their first election on Nov. 3. He said it’s one of the best parts of his job.

Read moreOn the road again: Secretary Wayne Williams swings through Colorado

Former House colleagues praise Bill Berens; funeral services set for Saturday

Broomfield Mayor Bill Berens poses for a photo in the city council chambers. (The Denver Post)
Broomfield Mayor Bill Berens poses for a photo in the city council chambers. (The Denver Post)

The men and women who served with Republican Bill Berens in the state House on Friday praised the lawmaker for his devotion to the city of Broomfield and daring to speak his mind to make Colorado a better place.

“Bill Berens was a dapper, friendly soul,” said Sen. Mary Hodge, D-Brighton, who was chairwoman of the House Local Government Committee when Berens was a member.

“I recall that many of his contributions to our discussions began with ‘When I was mayor of Broomfield, we … ,’  or ‘In Broomfield, we ….’ He was very proud of his city and the role he had played in its progress,” she said.  “I’ll miss him at United Power legislative lunches where we would reminisce about ‘the good old days.’ May he rest in peace.”

Berens died Monday at the age of 66 after battling cancer for seven months. His funeral service is scheduled for 10 a.m. Saturday at the Nativity of  Our Lord Catholic Church in Broomfield.

The Broomfield Enterprise and The Denver Post chronicled the life of Berens, a civil engineer who served four terms as Broomfield mayor and one term in the House before being swept out of office in the Democratic tidal wave of 2006.

“Rep. Berens and I opposed one another in two House races,” said Rep. Dianne Primavera, a Democrat. “He defeated me in 2004. I defeated him in 2006. Despite being competitors, he and I respected one another and had a cordial relationship.  He even offered several times to teach me to play golf! Ironically, my story has been one of a cancer survivor. Sadly, he had a different outcome with his illness. I’m still in shock at his passing.”

Happy 100th anniversary Rocky Mountain National Park

Russ and Lynn Waring, wearing period costumes, flank Estes Park Mayor Bill Pinkham at the 100th anniversary celebration of Rocky Mountain National Park. The event was Sept. 4 although the camera says Sept. 5. (Waring photo)
Russ and Lynn Waring, wearing period costumes, flank Estes Park Mayor Bill Pinkham at the 100th anniversary celebration of Rocky Mountain National Park on Sept. 4. (Waring photo)

When you spend your days off at your second home in Estes Park, the 100th anniversary of Rocky Mountain National Park feels like a family affair, so much so that Lynn Waring and her husband Russ dressed in period costumes for the big party.

Lynn works for the Colorado Secretary of State Office’s business and licensing division and she took off on Sept. 4 to attend the anniversary celebration at Glacier Basin Campground. (The camera date is wrong.)

“Oh, it was beautiful,” she said. “There were about 1,000 people and they had cake and lemonade. It was so well organized that they didn’t have long lines.”

The Arvada resident it was exciting when the “bigwigs” showed up, including Gov. John Hickenlooper and U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner. Lynn’s husband is 6 foot 4 so he was able to raise his camera and get some good shots with her and the bigwigs.

Read moreHappy 100th anniversary Rocky Mountain National Park

Mike McPhee and Dana Crawford: Chronicling the woman who saved “the soul of a city”

Dana Crawford with retired journalist Mike McPhee, who wrote a book on the visionary and preservationist, at their book signing Tuesday at Union Station. (Lynn Bartels)
Dana Crawford with retired journalist Mike McPhee, who wrote a book on the visionary and preservationist, at their book signing Tuesday at Union Station. (Lynn Bartels)

When I moved to Denver in the summer of 1993 to work as the night cops reporter for the Rocky Mountain News, my editors occasionally dispatched me to an abandoned flour mill where hobos had started yet another fire.

I already found the streets around downtown confusing and the poor Denver Fire Department would take my calls and try to guide me to the location in the dark, where I would finally arrive only to find that police had already shooed away the transients.

You can imagine my shock in 1997 when preservationist Dana Crawford announced she was turning the flour mill into condominiums.

I wasn’t the only one who thought the idea was “just shy of insane,” as author Mike McPhee says in his new book, “Dana Crawford:  50 Years Saving the Soul of a City.”

“In the late 1960s, it was shut down, emptied of most of its heavy steel machinery and left to the pigeons, the homeless and the graffiti artists,” he wrote of the mill. “Dana’s close friend and colleague, Jeff Shoemaker of the Greenway Foundation, attended the press conference announcing the project and fell into disbelief.

“This is completely non-salvageable. No one will live down here. I’ll buy the dynamite  and I’ll push the plunger,” he told her.

The condominiums were a huge success.

Read moreMike McPhee and Dana Crawford: Chronicling the woman who saved “the soul of a city”