“Strong Sisters” documents the role of women in Colorado politics

The Andersons: Kate, granddaughter of former lawmaker Norma Anderson, center, and daughter of former Jefferson County Clerk and Recorder Pam Anderson, right, attended the "Strong Sisters" premiere Sunday afternoon. Colorado has yet to have a woman governor, but Norma Anderson said her granddaughter would be perfect for the job when she gets older.
The Andersons: Kate, left, the granddaughter of former lawmaker Norma Anderson, center, and the daughter of former Jefferson County Clerk and Recorder Pam Anderson, right. They attended the “Strong Sisters” premiere Sunday afternoon.
Two Republican lawmakers, Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik of Adams County and Rep. Kathleen Conti of Arapahoe County, at the showing of "Strong Sisters."
Two Republican lawmakers, Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik of Adams County and Rep. Kathleen Conti of Arapahoe County, at the showing of “Strong Sisters.”

A who’s who of female politicians — including former House majority leaders Norma Anderson to Amy Stephens — showed up Sunday for the premiere of the documentary they starred in, “Strong Sisters,” which examines women and Colorado politics.

The bipartisan film, produced by Meg Kruizenga Froelich and Laura Hoeppner, looks at the many firsts for women in Colorado but notes how they haven fall short when it comes to higher office.

Only four women have served in the U.S. House — Pat Schroeder, Diana DeGette, Marilyn Musgrave and Betsy Markey — and no woman has been elected to the U.S. Senate or governor.

Read more“Strong Sisters” documents the role of women in Colorado politics

If you’re Chris Hansen, where’s Sen. Cory Gardner?

U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner, a Yuma Republican, and his chief of staff, Chris Hansen. (Facebook)
U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner, a Yuma Republican, and his chief of staff, Chris Hansen. (Facebook)

Meet Chris Hansen, the chief of staff for Republican U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner. Meet Chris Hansen, one of three Democrats running for a Denver state House seat.

The two Chris Hansens have never met but their paths have crossed for more than a year.

When candidate Chris Hansen showed up at the Denver Rustlers lunch on Sept. 1  guests peppered him with questions and comments. “Wait, you’re not the Chris Hansen I know!” and “I thought Cory’s chief of staff would be here when I saw your name on the list.”

It’s happened at other events, too, where both Republicans and Democrats are in the crowd.

Chief of Staff Chris Hansen knows the feeling. He opened up his Facebook page last year to find he had been “tagged” in a post by DA candidate Michael Carrigan as attending an event where Betsy Markey, a Democrat running for state treasurer, “gave great remarks about her race.”

“Wrong Chris Hansen,” Chris Hansen wrote on Facebook. “A very wrong Chris Hansen, since I’m actually Cory’s campaign manager. Looks like a fun event though.”

“It was,” Carrigan replied. “Should have brought Cory!”

Read moreIf you’re Chris Hansen, where’s Sen. Cory Gardner?