All about U: 2 former journalists

The U from Dan Haley, formerly of the Denver Post and now president of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association.
Former Rocky cartoonist Ed Stein’s U.

Argh. I blew it. This was to publish on Saturday. So pretend it’s Saturday when you read it.

One of the cool things about Colorado Secretary of State’s UChooseCO campaign is seeing how the wooden U’s that have been handed out are decorated.  I thought former Rocky Mountain News cartoonist Ed Stein would, well, draw cartoons. I figured former Denver Post editorial page editor Dan Haley might go with a pop culture reference.

I guessed wrong.

The U’s are part of a campaign to inform unaffiliated voters that they can now automatically participate in primary elections without having to affiliate with one party or another.

Unaffiliated voters also are being told DON’T SPOIL IT. They will get two ballots, one for Republican candidates and the other for Democratic candidates, but they can only vote one. If they return both, neither ballot will count.

Ed Stein.
Dan Haley.

We asked those who received the wooden U’s to show off their work on Twitter and other social media venues.

“Luddite that I am I don’t get hashtags (I know, so 20th Century),” Stein wrote.

That’s OK, we promoted it for him.

Haley is known to quote “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” and drool over Angie Dickinson in “Police Woman.” He’s such a Broncos fan that Colorado Public Radio featured him in a story about the anniversary of the team’s first trip to the Super Bowl. But Haley, now the president of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association, instead went with a work theme.

Every day between now and the June 26 primary we will highlight a wooden U or two. Recipients were asked to consider their values when decorating or to just have fun. Some clerks highlighted their counties.

Check out more decorated U’s on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Denver Rustlers: A Colorado tradition

Gathered for today’s Denver Rustler’s event: Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams, Steve Weil of Rockmount Ranch, and Wes Friednash and Josh Hanfling, who both help oversee the event. (SOS photo)

For 33 years now, Colorado’s business, civil and political leaders have worked together to make Denver Rustlers the guardian angel of both the Colorado State Fair and the rural kids who show their animals at the event.

Denver City Councilwoman Kendra Black and Denver Clerk and Recorder Debra Johnson. (SOS photo)

The Rustlers boarded three large buses today and headed south to Pueblo, where its pool of money will be used to bid on sheep, cattle and more during the Junior Livestock Sale.

“It’s one of my favorite events,” said Secretary of State Wayne Williams, who works in Denver and commutes from Colorado Springs. “It’s always nice to get outside of the metro area and visit the rest of the state.”

The event begins in Greenwood Village with an early lunch at Del Frisco’s (home of the most incredible mini corn dogs you will ever eat).

It attracts current and former governors (John Hickenlooper and Bill Ritter, respectively), current and former agricultural commissioners (Don Brown and Don Ament, respectively); members of Congress and the General Assembly, county commissioners, city council members and more.

Read moreDenver Rustlers: A Colorado tradition

Fracking & friendship: Dan Haley made my nephew’s day

Erin Cummings, who teaches science at Skinner Middle School in Denver, and her student, Maxwell Bungum, my nephew. (Skinner photo)

One day when cleaning out my Google account I saw an e-mail from my nephew Maxwell Bungum that I had missed. I opened it up to find an invitation to edit his fracking homework.

Fracking! Editing! I was too busy to inquire what was going on, but Max called several days later to say, “Did you get my e-mail? You’re supposed to forward it.” Then he hung up and headed for school.

I still didn’t know what the whole thing was about but I forwarded his report to Dan Haley, the president and CEO of the Colorado Oil & Gas Association. What happened next made a 12-year-old happy, his parents very proud and his sixth-grade science teacher at Skinner Middle School ecstatic.

“A CEO actually took the time to write a full blown letter,” teacher Erin Cummings said. “We need more CEOs to do that. I was shocked when Max showed me the letter.”

Haley told Max his paper was “fantastic.”

“We need more people like you who take the time to research a controversial topic, in this case hydraulic fracturing,” Haley said, “and then draw your own conclusion based on science and facts, rather than what your friends or social media might be saying.”

Read moreFracking & friendship: Dan Haley made my nephew’s day