Sabor attendee: Secretary Williams “cares about our community”

The Denver Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s 11th annual Sabor on Friday night at the Denver Botanic Gardens attracted plenty of people. From left to right, state GOP chairman Jeff Hays, with his back to the camera, Maria Del Carmen Guzman-Weese, Secretary of State Wayne Williams, GOP gubernatorial candidate Walker Stapleton and Rocío Pérez, the CEO of Inventíva. (SOS photo)
Secretary of State Wayne Williams with Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jared Polis. (SOS Photo).

Secretary of State Wayne Williams attended the 11th annual Sabor last week hosted by the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Metro Denver at the Denver Botanical Gardens.

“Sabor,” the Spanish word for flavor, was the theme of the night, which included a “sensory exploration of the Americas.”

The event featured an impressive array of food and drink, along with traditional Peruvian outfits and live Spanish music. encompassing the Latin American culture.

“Colorado has a rich Hispanic heritage and our office has a great partnership with Denver’s Hispanic Chamber, including working together to make a welcome video for new businesses,” Williams said.

Saida Perez and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams. (SOS photo)

Local businesses came out to celebrate.

Saida Perez, owner of Tru Services insurance agency, stopped Secretary Williams to thank him for his work and take a picture with him.

“The Sabor was a great event for networking and allowing the government and business to work together. I have a lot of clientele that need to have things notarized and Secretary Williams has made this process easy and efficient,” Perez said.

It was an experience repeated throughout the evening.

“It was a lot of fun to sample some great food, experience awesome culture and visit with so many friends,” Williams said.

“The best thing, though, was being stopped by folks I’d never met who wanted to let me know how easy it was to use our website to register a business or nonprofit, become a notary, or register to vote,” Williams said.

Read moreSabor attendee: Secretary Williams “cares about our community”

License plates — a metal piece of history

Crowley County Clerk Lucile Nichols arranged for the display of license plates outside her office in Ordway. (SOS photo)
Crowley County Clerk Lucile Nichols arranged for the display of license plates outside her office in Ordway. (SOS photo)

County clerks are busy, busy people — Arapahoe County District Attorney George Brauchler calls them the “guardians of the galaxy” — and their staffs handle a variety of duties. Elections, recordings, motor vehicle transactions — some even take minutes for their county commissioners.

One of the fun things about visiting county clerks statewide is checking out their display of license plates.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams on Wednesday visited Otero County Clerk Sharon Sisnroy in La Junta, Crowley County Clerk Lucile Nichols in Ordway and Lincoln County Clerk Corrine Lengel in Hugo. It’s part of his effort to personally visit with all 64 county clerks to see their operations up close and discuss how his office can provide service.

On Friday Williams is visiting Saguache County Clerk Carla Gomez before heading to Grand Junction where he will speak to Club 20 on Saturday about statewide ballot measures.

Shannon Casillas handles motor vehicle duties for the Otero County clerk's office. (SOS photo)
Shannon Casillas handles motor vehicle duties for the Otero County clerk’s office. (SOS photo)

In Otero County, Shannon Casillas has license plates from all around the country displayed above and near her desk. Let the record reflect that the license plate above the doorway leading to the clerk’s vault is from the great state of South Dakota.

“It’s fun,” she said of her décor, noting the artwork of license plates was a gift.

In neighboring Crowley County, Nichols arranged to have the license plates her office had collected over the years arranged on a wall in the hallway with a nice wood-and-glass frame. Motorists used to get new plates every year, she explained.

A cool old Colorado license plate.
A cool old Colorado license plate.

In Lincoln County, arrowheads, antique office equipment and a replica of the old courthouse grace the hallway and lobby. Its reputation for short lines make it a haven for Coloradans wanting to quickly title and license new or used motor vehicles, trailers and such.

Lengel charges a special fee for out-of-county residents.

“We had somebody come from Silverthorne one time,” she said.

Denver Rustlers: another great Colorado tradition

Businessman Eddie Robinson, Secretary of State Wayne Williams and philanthropist and businessman Larry Mizel at this year's Denver Rustlers event. (SOS photo)
Businessman Eddie Robinson, Secretary of State Wayne Williams and philanthropist and businessman Larry Mizel at this year’s Denver Rustlers event. (SOS photo)

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams considers it a privilege to attend the Denver Rustlers event, which raises money to buy livestock from the kids showing animals at the Colorado State Fair.

Democrats, Republicans and business leaders come together every year for a light lunch at Del Frisco’s Grille, donated by the restaurant. They then head down to Pueblo to bid on livestock and mingle and eat some more. The event began 32 years ago, when an economic downturn threatened to shut down the Junior Livestock Sale at the State Fair. Since then, Denver Rustlers has raised nearly $3 million.

Among those attending the Denver Rustlers event this year were U.S. Sens. Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner; U.S. Reps. Jared Polis, Mike Coffman and Diana DeGette, legislators, city council members and various chiefs of staffs. That means you Doug Friednash.

Read moreDenver Rustlers: another great Colorado tradition

Warning: Former journalist doing math on Colorado Day

My pathetic ability to do simple math received even more public scrutiny today when I messed up a text message I sent from my boss’ account:

Colorado is known as the Centennial State because it joined the Union in 1876, which means it celebrated its 140th birthday today. (I did mean to say “You wear well.”)

I wrote the tweet last week and scheduled it to drop today, which happened to be the opening of the Colorado County Clerks Association’s summer conference. I was busy at the event saying hello to clerks I’ve met on the road with Secretary of State Wayne Williams, and live-tweeting District Attorney George Brauchler’s hilarious speech so I took me a while to figure out there was a problem.

So then  I tweeted something else on Williams’ account:

 

Which is true.

Read moreWarning: Former journalist doing math on Colorado Day

Hey, District Attorney George Brauchler, been there, done that

Westword;s hilarious photo illustration after Arapahoe County District Attorney George Brauchler accidentally tweeted from the courtroom, in violation of the judge's order. (Courtesy of Westword/Jay Vollmar/art director)
Westword’s hilarious photo illustration after Arapahoe County District Attorney George Brauchler accidentally tweeted from the courtroom, in violation of the judge’s order. (Courtesy of Westword/Jay Vollmar/art director)

Arapahoe County District Attorney George Brauchler feels my pain.

I  checked my phone one night and discovered I had a message from a reporter asking if he could get a copy of the letter the secretary of state had sent to the Jefferson County clerk regarding its recall election.

“Yes,” I responded, and then I sent another message, “Let me know if you get it.”

Pretty soon I started seeing tweets making fun of my seemingly random messages. But I texted the reporter, I thought. Only I hadn’t. I was responding to a direct message. And when I explained that on Twitter, the hilarious @MissingPundit posted this gem:

“The old George Brauchler defense. Likely story.”

Snap!

“I thought that was brilliant,” Brauchler said.

Read moreHey, District Attorney George Brauchler, been there, done that