Secretary Williams, “you’ve run a tip-top operation”

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams, left, with Rep. Bob Rankin, R-Carbondale, and two SOS staffers, elections director Judd Choate and IT director Trevor Timmons, during Friday’s meeting before the Joint Budget Committee. (SOS photo)

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams received plenty of praise during his final appearances before two legislative committees, where he highlighted the office’s achievements and challenges.

The El Paso County Republican presented his budget requests to the legislature’s Joint Budget Committee Friday morning, and later in the afternoon he discussed performance plans, regulatory and legislative agendas, and budget requests as part of the SMART Act hearing.

Legislative aide, Michael Templeton, who works for Sen. Lois Court, a Denver Democrat, center, and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams. (SOS photo)

“I’ve had the opportunity to work very closely with you and your office on a variety of issues over the years,” Sen. Dominick Moreno, D-Commerce City, and the chairman of the Joint Budget Committee, told Williams.

“I have to say, you’ve run a tip-top operation.”

Lawmakers on the the Joint State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee were equally complimentary later that day.

“I just want to thank you for your years of service to Colorado and the excellent job you’ve done as our secretary of state and how hard I know you’ve worked to be bipartisan as much as you can be,” said Sen. Lois Court, D-Denver.

“That takes a lot to do the kind of work you’ve done and to try to work as hard as you have across the aisle and I absolutely appreciate it, so thank you.”

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Colorado’s county clerks: the rock stars of democracy

The Colorado Secretary of State’s elections director, Judd Choate; Jack Arrowsmith, executive director of the Statewide Internet Portal Authority; and state Sen. Lois Court, D-Denver, at the Colorado County Clerks Association conference in Snowmass Village. Court on Monday received an award from the CCCA. (SOS photo)

By Lynn Bartels and Julia Sunny

A state senator on Monday praised Colorado’s 64 county clerks, saying they’re the reason Colorado is a “beacon of how elections should be done.”

“I really believe the county clerks are the rock stars of democracy,” said Denver Democrat Lois Court. “I know you all work your little tails off … and I salute you for everything you do.”

Court was one of three lawmakers honored by the Colorado County Clerks Association, which is holding its summer conference in Snowmass Village. The association also honored Sen. Don Coram, R-Montrose, and Rep. Jessie Danielson, D-Wheat Ridge, and presented an award to Logan County Attorney Alan Samber, for his work on a bill that involved land title registrations.

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A late-night battle over Colorado’s unaffiliated voters

Sens. Kevin Lundberg, a Larimer County Republican, and Steve Fenberg, a Boulder County Democrat, and two county clerks, Matt Crane of Arapahoe and Debra Johnson of Denver, listen to questions from a Senate committee late Tuesday on an elections bill.

A state Senate committee late Tuesday passed a measure aimed at implementing two ballot measures that impact unaffiliated voters participating in primary elections.

Sen. Steve Fenberg, a Boulder Democrat, testified it is “always a little precarious” to “tinker” with measures voters approve.

“In this case, I don’t think the legislature has a choice,” he said. “Some things need to be fixed, some things need to be implemented, we need to pay for it and the secretary of state’s office needs direction on how to implement this new law.”

Fenberg and Sen. Kevin Lundberg, R-Berthoud, are co-sponsoring Senate Bill 305, which the Senate State, Veterans & Military Affairs Committee approved on a 4-1 vote shortly before midnight — the last of 16 bills the committee began hearing at 1:30 that afternoon.

“Is Senate Bill 305 an attempt to implement what we believe the voters said they wanted, or it is an attempt to correct some perceived errors in the content of 107 and 108 so they will work more smoothly?” Sen. Lois Court, D-Denver, asked during the hearing.

Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert testifies in favor of Senate Bill 305, an elections measure.

“I think it probably does a little bit of both,” Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert responded.

Proposition 107 requires the state to hold presidential primaries, and allows unaffiliated voters to participate without affiliating with a major party. The next presidential primary is in 2020.

Proposition 108 allows unaffiliated voters to participate in primary elections held every two years in June, again without affiliating. That measure is the most pressing one because it impacts the 2018 primary, when voters will pick candidates for the statewide constitutional offices, including governor and treasurer.

A key sticking point on how to implement the measure is whether the public has the right to find out whether an unaffiliated voter chose to mark a Democrat or Republican primary ballot. The disagreement has been spelled out in recent stories by The Colorado Independent’s Corey Hutchins and The Denver Post’s Brian Eason.

The Colorado Secretary of State’s office supports the disclosure of that information.

“The fact that you voted, the ballot style that you vote, has always been recorded in the state-wide voter registration system and has been a matter of public record,” Staiert said.

But others fear such disclosure would deter participation from unaffiliated voters, when the goals of the two ballot measures was to make it easier for unaffiliated voters to access the ballot.

Curtis Hubbard with OnSightPublic Affairs delivers petition signatures to the Colorado Secretary of State’s office in 2016 for two ballot measures dealing with unaffiliated voters. (SOS photo)

Since their passage, the implementation of Propositions 107 and 108 has been a key issue for Secretary of State Wayne Williams. He discussed
the measures when he met this year with county clerks at their various regional training conferences, including ones in Cañon City, Sterling and Rifle.

Sen. Owen Hill, R-Colorado Springs, was the lone “no” vote against the bill, which likely will be heard Friday by the Senate Appropriations Committee. Court said she initially opposed the measure, until hearing Staiert’s testimony.

Hill complained the bill was being rushed through late at night and late in the session — which by law must end Wednesday — and he wanted more time to study the issue. Denver County Clerk Debra Johnson echoed that concern during her testimony, as did her elections director, Amber McReynolds.

“We have been talking about this for months,” Staiert countered.

Sens. Kevin Lundberg, a Larimer County Republican, and Steve Fenberg, a Boulder County Democrat, present their bill late Tuesday on implementing ballot measures that change voting requirements for unaffiliated voters.

Previously, unaffiliated voters could participate in a primary by declaring to be either a Republican or a Democrat. Now they will automatically receive a ballot, but the question is, what kind?

Some election activists want a “super ballot” sent to unaffiliated candidates with the names of both Republican and Democrat candidates.

But Staiert pointed out that some counties do not have the capability of tabulating those kinds of ballots. Also, she said, in other states a combined ballot has led to a high “spoilage” rate, meaning voters’ ballots were tossed because they marked candidates on both the Republican and Democrat tickets.

The bill gives unaffiliated voters the right to specify whether they want to receive a Democrat or Republican ballot so they wouldn’t be receiving both.

The Year of the Mature Woman

Rep. Beth McCann and prosecutor Helen Morgan are running for Denver district attorney. (SOS photo)
No matter what happens Election Night, Denver will elect its first woman district attorney. Running are Rep. Beth McCann, a Democrat, and prosecutor Helen Morgan, who is unaffiliated. (SOS photo)

UPDATE: As of Tuesday Nov. 15, almost 147,000 more women than men have voted in Colorado.

On the night of the Colorado primary, I called Democratic Rep. Lois Court of Denver to congratulate her on winning her three-way race for state Senate.

I didn’t have a dog in the fight but I had covered Court. We also talked about Rep. Beth McCann’s win over two men in her three-way Democratic primary for Denver district attorney.

“I guess it is The Year of the Woman,” I said.

“The Year of the  Mature Woman,” Court corrected me. After all, the 67-year-old had just defeated a man and a woman in their 30s.

The Democratic nominee for president, Hillary Clinton, just celebrated her 69th birthday. And there’s a chance of an increase in the number of women serving in the U.S. Senate next year.

“I like to call it the ‘Year of the Ageless Woman,'” said former House Majority Leader Amy Stephens.

Given Clinton’s nomination and some of the topics in this presidential cycle, the Colorado Secretary of State also tracked ballot returns by gender this  election. 

So long, 2016 legislative session — and certain lawmakers

Senate President Bill Cadman, Senate Majority Leader Mark Scheffel and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams on the final day of the 2016 legislative session Wednesday. (SOS photo)
Senate President Bill Cadman, Senate Majority Leader Mark Scheffel and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams on the final day of the 2016 legislative session Wednesday. (SOS photo)

Another legislative session is in the history books and another crop of term-limited lawmakers is on its way out,  including Republican Bill Cadman and Democrat Mary Hodge, who each served 16 years under the Gold Dome.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams visited with lawmakers in the House and Senate on their final day of the session on Wednesday.

“Thank you for your service,” he said to Cadman, the Senate president, and Mark Scheffel of Parker, the Senate majority leader, who also is term limited.

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