Colorado county clerks: thinking outside the box regarding the box

Logan County has gone to drive-by voting, with Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon installing a new ballot drop box that allows voters to pull up and drop off their ballots.

Logan County Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon demonstrates how the new drop box can be closed and locked for times when there are deadlines for official documents, like ballots or tax payments. (Photo courtesy of Sara Waite / Sterling Journal-Advocate)
Logan County Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon demonstrates how the new drop box can be closed and locked. (Photo courtesy of Sara Waite / Sterling Journal-Advocate)

Bacon also got the OK from Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams’ office to make it a “multi-use box” so that county residents can drop off their motor-vehicle registrations.

Other county clerks also use 24-hour ballot boxes, which under secretary of state rules must be monitored by surveillance cameras with the data being preserved for 25 months.  It is illegal to drop off more than 10 ballots at a time, and the outside of the envelopes must be signed by the voter in order to  be counted, state  elections director Judd Choate said.

According to the Sterling-Journal Advocate, Bacon also reached out to the other county departments, with Treasurer Patty Bartlett believing the box would be useful for receiving tax payments. Bacon said residents can drop off correspondence for any county office, such as a letter to the county commissioners.

“Whatever is in there,'” Bacon told the newspaper, “we’ll make sure it gets to whatever county office it needs to.”

Here’s a look at ballot-box practices in some other counties, per their clerks or election officials:

Read moreColorado county clerks: thinking outside the box regarding the box

Secretary Williams updates county clerks on NFIB lawsuit

Secretary of State Wayne Williams, back and center, with county clerks from the state's southern regional at their fall meeting Tuesday in Alamosa. (Clerk photo)
Secretary of State Wayne Williams, back and center, with county clerks from the state’s southern region at their fall meeting Tuesday in Alamosa. (Clerk photo)

Secretary of State Wayne Williams gave county clerks in southern Colorado an update Tuesday on a lawsuit the state’s leading small-business group filed against his office, saying money collected through business filing fees shouldn’t be used to pay for election costs.

The clerks asked Williams to draw up a summary they can present to their commissioners on the fiscal impact  of the lawsuit filed by the National Federation of Independent Business. A Denver judge, who heard arguments in the case last week, is expected to make a ruling within two months.

Clerks present at the conference were, left to right, Melanie Woodward of Alamosa County, Lawrence Gallegos of Conejos,  Tiffany Parker of La Plata, Debbi Green of Park, Krystal Brown of Teller, Secretary Williams,  Lori Mitchell of Chaffee,  Kelley Camper of Custer, Cindy Hill of Rio Grande, Patti Nickell of Bent,  Carla Gomez of Saguache, Nancy Cruz of Huerfano,  Peach Vigil of Las Animas and Kathy Simillion of Gunnison.

Pueblo County Clerk Bo Ortiz wasn’t in the shot — he had stepped out to take a call when it was snapped.

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