A treasure: newspaper clips and more at the Colorado Secretary of State’s Office

A small sampling of the newspaper clips regarding former Secretary of State Mary Estill Buchanan's "furniture caper." (SOS photo)
A sampling of newspaper articles regarding former Secretary of State Mary Estill Buchanan’s “furniture caper” after she left office. (SOS photo)

News clippings from former Secretary of State Mary Estill Buchanan’s “furniture caper.” Scrapbooks from her successor, Natalie Meyer. And an unforgettable feature on Colorado tax zealot Douglas Bruce.

My new intern, Colorado State University student Julia Sunny, and I discovered a treasure trove of items Tuesday when cleaning out my office for a painting-carpeting project this weekend at the Colorado Secretary of State’s office. I was told that my predecessor, Rich Coolidge, took two days cleaning out the office when he left last year, but there was still plenty of stuff in the drawers for me to sort through and admire.

Douglas Bruce in 1993 hugs his big ball of string. The photograph accompanied a story on the crotchety architect of the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights.

As someone who spent 35 years working for  newspapers before becoming the spokeswoman for Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams last August, I love newspaper clips. Yes, they take up space, but they’re so much fun to pore over.

The 1993 feature on Bruce was written after voters the year before passed his Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights. I’ve posted the piece several times in later years after Bruce made news, kicking a photographer on the floor of the Colorado House and a conviction on tax evasion.

But to see the story in print was something else. In the article, Bruce called the then secretary of state a “crook,” the executive branch of state government “pimps,” the state legislature “prostitutes” and anybody else opposed to TABOR as “drones.”

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“Strong Sisters” documents the role of women in Colorado politics

The Andersons: Kate, granddaughter of former lawmaker Norma Anderson, center, and daughter of former Jefferson County Clerk and Recorder Pam Anderson, right, attended the "Strong Sisters" premiere Sunday afternoon. Colorado has yet to have a woman governor, but Norma Anderson said her granddaughter would be perfect for the job when she gets older.
The Andersons: Kate, left, the granddaughter of former lawmaker Norma Anderson, center, and the daughter of former Jefferson County Clerk and Recorder Pam Anderson, right. They attended the “Strong Sisters” premiere Sunday afternoon.
Two Republican lawmakers, Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik of Adams County and Rep. Kathleen Conti of Arapahoe County, at the showing of "Strong Sisters."
Two Republican lawmakers, Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik of Adams County and Rep. Kathleen Conti of Arapahoe County, at the showing of “Strong Sisters.”

A who’s who of female politicians — including former House majority leaders Norma Anderson to Amy Stephens — showed up Sunday for the premiere of the documentary they starred in, “Strong Sisters,” which examines women and Colorado politics.

The bipartisan film, produced by Meg Kruizenga Froelich and Laura Hoeppner, looks at the many firsts for women in Colorado but notes how they haven fall short when it comes to higher office.

Only four women have served in the U.S. House — Pat Schroeder, Diana DeGette, Marilyn Musgrave and Betsy Markey — and no woman has been elected to the U.S. Senate or governor.

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