Late Gov. Ralph Carr, honored yet again

Ralph Carr being sworn in as governor of Colorado in 1941. He went on to be honored for his defense of Japanese-American citizens. (Denver Public Library, Western History photographic collections, The Denver Post)

By Yasaman Hosseni

Late Gov. Ralph Carr, whose fierce opposition to interning Japanese-Americans during World War II led to him being named Colorado’s “Person of the Century,” has been recognized for another honor.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams.

Carr is one of three finalists for the Margaret Chase Smith American Democracy Award given by the National Association of Secretaries of State. Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams nominated Carr for the award, which recognizes acts of “political courage, uncommon character and selfless action in the realm of public service.”

Carr was first elected Colorado governor in 1938, and again in 1940. He stood up to those threatening violence against Japanese interned at the state’s interment camp on the Eastern Plains.

“If you harm them,” the Republican said in 1942, “you must first harm me.”

The winner will be announced during the National Association of Secretaries of State’s 2018 summer conference that kicks off next week in Philadelphia.

Read moreLate Gov. Ralph Carr, honored yet again