Gov. Hickenlooper signs bill dealing with school board race spending

Gov. John HIckenlooper signs House Bill 1282 dealing with school board race campaign spending into law Wednesday afternoon. Among those present, from left to right, Secretary of State staffer Melissa Polk, Steamboat Springs school board member Roger Good, Elena Nunez of Common Cause, former SOS intern Lizzie Stephani, Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert, Sen. Nancy Todd, SOS staffer Steve Bouey, Sen. Jack Tate, Reps. Brittany Pettersen and KC Becker, SOS staffer Tim Griesmer and Jeffco parent Shawna Fritzler. (SOS photo)
Gov. John Hickenlooper on Wednesday signs into law House Bill 1282, which deals with school board race campaign spending. Among those present, from left to right, Secretary of State staffer Melissa Polk, Steamboat Springs school board member Roger Good, Elena Nunez of Common Cause, former SOS intern Lizzie Stephani, Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert, Sen. Nancy Todd, SOS staffer Steve Bouey, Sen. Jack Tate, Reps. Brittany Pettersen and KC Becker, SOS staffer Tim Griesmer and Jeffco parent Shawna Fritzler. (SOS photo)

A Steamboat Springs school board member frustrated that he couldn’t find out until after an election how much outside groups poured into to elect their favorite board candidates watched Wednesday as Gov. John Hickenlooper signed an accountability bill into law.

Roger Good testified on behalf of House Bill 1282 at a Senate committee hearing — he would have been at the House hearing, too, he said, but he was out of state.

“I wanted to be a voice for rural Colorado,” Good said after the bill signing.

House Bill 1282 bill requires the disclosure of independent expenditures of more than $1,000 within 60 days prior to the election. It also requires disclosure of spending on advertisements, billboards and direct mailings. It does not deal with individual donations to candidates; a bill to limit those contributions died.

Currently, information about independent expenditures in school board races has to be filed with the Colorado Secretary of State’s office quarterly, including a report on Oct. 15 before the November election. But the next report doesn’t  have to be filed until Jan. 15 of the following year, allowing donations throughout October and early November to be kept quiet until after the election.

That’s why Good got involved.

“Anyone should be able to give whatever they want to any candidate they want, but it’s in the public’s best interest to know who’s giving,” Good told his hometown paper, the Steamboat Springs Pilot & Today, on Wednesday.

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